The Best Investments of 2018? Art, Wine and Cars

The Best Investments of 2018? Art, Wine and Cars

Who beat the market this year? Investors who like the finer things in life. Luxury assets, including wine, art, classic cars and fancy colored diamonds, have outperformed stocks and bonds this year. “People are looking for a place for their cash, and the security of holding something physical is appealing,” said Anthony Maxwell, director at Liv-ex, the London-based wine exchange. “They are looking outside securities, and gold is not what it used to be.”

Lily Yu Monterey Herald

Lily Yu Monterey Herald

“Art,” says Yu, “is home, and home is art. This is my philosophy as an art agent. Your whole home is your work of art.”
Paintings and Pairings

Paintings and Pairings

Art appraiser, advisor and curator Lily Yu is combining her love of art with her appreciation of food and wine for “Paintings and Pairings,” a series of dinners featuring the works of a local artist combined with a downtown chef’s cuisine and a Monterey County winery. Yu said she plans to hold the dinners at different locations around the Peninsula.

The inaugural event will be a collaboration between paint- er Paul Seftel and chef/owner Soerke Peters at the Village Corner, located at Dolores and Sixth, Sept. 5 from 5 to 9 p.m.

The evening will begin with wine and light bites during an opening reception for “Arts Techtonic, Forces of Nature by Paul Seftel,” including works on canvas and paper, and four outdoor wall reliefs. Born in London, Seftel is an abstract mixed-media painter, using metal, minerals and raw pigment in his works. While his studio is at the American Tin Can- nery in Paci c Grove, his work will hang at the Village Corner through Dec. 2.

“I chose Chef Soerke and Paul Seftel because they are both innovators in their realms who are inspired by nature and Earth,” she said. “Chef Soerke’s emphasis on food is on freshness, local ingredients and seasonality. Artist Seftel uses all organic materials to make his homemade paint, such as natural minerals, pure pigments and pulverized stone.”

While he is keeping the menu a secret, Peters said, “It will be abstract cooking, if there is such a thing.”

“As chefs, we love to be challenged with new ideas, con- cepts and opportunities,” he said, and Yu’s mission for Paintings and Pairings “is very interesting and challenging, indeed.”

“Thinking of Paul’s interpretations from canvas to sculp- tures and putting it on a plate is no easy task,” Peters said. “Getting to know the artist personally does help inspire me to use similar techniques in the art of plating.”

Each of the four courses will be paired with wines from Albatross Ridge.

Yu said that throughout the dinner, which is set to start at 7 p.m., Seftel will talk about his work and how he creates it, and Peters will discuss what inspires him in the kitchen. Each guest will receive a copy of the evening’s menu signed by the Seftel and Peters to mark the occasion.

“I am not sure what will happen at the dinner. This pairing of artist and chef has never been done before,” she said. “This is for people hungry for adventure and who have appetites for fresh ideas and organic inspiration.”

Each seat costs $95, including tax and tip.

View pdf of the article here

Los Angeles | Monterey | San Francisco
© Copyright 2022, Agent Art | All Rights Reserved

Ambiguity and intrigue in a new art and food function

Ambiguity and intrigue in a new art and food function

Art appraiser, adviser and curator Lily Yu owned two restaurants that doubled as art galleries, so her Paintings and Pairings event, a conjunction of Chef Soerke Peters and artist Paul Seftel, is a natural progression.

It’s a free art opening in The Village Corner, comprising about 20 pieces titled Arts Techtonic, Forces of Nature by Paul Seftel. That’s followed by a four-course dinner ($95) of Peters’ “abstract cooking” that matches the themes, colors and processes of the art. It’s all paired with by wine from Albatross Ridge and conversation likely to veer in a few directions.